Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Posts tagged ‘TAAR’

Inconsistent (tax) terminology adds to confusion

The inconsistent use of (tax) terminology in drafting / enacting legislation and communicating issues re: perceived tax abuse, developing specific/targeted/general anti-avoidance rules (SAAR, TAAR, GAAR), anti-abuse rules, etc. promotes subjectivity, uncertainty, and misguided perceptions in trying to understand complex legal and technical international tax laws and regulations.

The recently drafted anti-abuse rule in the EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive (attached link for reference) is designed as a minimum standard to be adopted by EU Member States.  Article 1, paragraph 4 of the Directive states “This Directive shall not preclude the application of domestic or agreement-based provisions required for the prevention of tax evasion, tax fraud or abuse.”  This language should be compared to other tax legislation that introduce additional subjectivity and confusion with undefined and misunderstood terminology.

http://register.consilium.europa.eu/doc/srv?l=EN&f=ST%2016633%202014%20INIT

Subjective terminology that accompanies undefined verbiage as a basis for tax laws and regulations, such as anti-avoidance / abuse rules, further complicates comprehension, application, interpretation, and assessment of complex international tax rules.

The phrases “tax evasion” and “tax fraud” clearly set forth bright legal lines for definition and enforcement, whereas inherently subjective phrases of “tax avoidance,” “aggressive tax planning,” “intent of Parliament”, “tax abuse,” and similar terminology result in additional uncertainty for deciphering the true intent of significant tax legislation.

It would be beneficial to recognize the inherent inconsistencies of terminology applied in tax laws and regulations, and commence inclusion of verbiage and definitions that provide clarity promoting consistent application, implementation and enforcement of international tax guidelines.

UK Diverted Profits Tax: Parliamentary debate

The UK Diverted Profits Tax proposal (refer to 12 December 2014 post) will become effective in April, 2015.  The Parliament debate sheds light on the intentions for such tax, as well as the assumptions (true or false) underlying this initiative.

The debate clarifies that such “tax” is not meant to be a tax that meets the definition of a tax for double tax treaty purposes, therefore it is subject to domestic legislation and not overridden by its treaty network.  This rationale therefore leads to the premise that it may not qualify as a tax subject to a US Foreign Tax Credit, resulting in a double “tax” situation regardless of the nomenclature.  Additionally, the Mutual Agreement Procedure (MAP) provided for in a double tax treaty would not be available for recourse.

The tax is aggressive in its timing, ahead of the final OECD proposals and in contrast to other initiatives for which the UK is awaiting final BEPS guidance.  The debate highlights the cynicism about the OECD process, thus providing a rationale for unilateral legislation sooner vs. later.  Additionally, this proposal was discussed as a Targeted Anti-Avoidance Rule (TAAR), which is in addition to the EU and UK General Anti-Avoidance Rules (GAAR).

Most importantly, a diverted profit tax situation involves an initial recharacterization assessment by HMRC, requiring payment by the taxpayer, with appeals to follow later – a “Pay Now, Talk Later” approach.

The clock is ticking and time is winding down with alot of questions remaining unanswered.  The debate is provided for reference:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmhansrd/cm150107/halltext/150107h0001.htm

It is very useful to review the Intent of new laws to form a better understanding for the formation of such initiatives, as well as comprehension into the foresight of drafters re: possible appeals by the European Commission and/or European Court of Justice.

Denmark: (Super) GAAR?

The General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR) has received a status of prominence during 2014, and continues its subjective and complex override provisions in domestic law that are interwoven with treaty provisions.

Denmark has proposed a (Super) GAAR, trumping the EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive, EU Interest-Royalty Directive, EU Merger Directive and Danish double tax treaties.  Notwithstanding its current status as a “proposal,” Denmark’s intent is clearly shown to provide an umbrella rule, evidently overriding the respective treaties, providing that a “main purpose” rule which achieves tax advantages would be used to disallow respective tax benefits of the transaction(s).  The proposed rule would be effective by 01 May, 2015.

PwC’s Insight has provided a brief summary of the proposal:

Click to access pwc-denmark-introduce-gaar-double-tax-treaties-directives.pdf

GAAR continues to be “the elephant in the room,” highly visible although the rules and appeal avenues are distinct and arbitrary for every country.  Some countries have GAAR rules, along with specific / targeted anti-avoidance rules (SAAR / TAAR).  Thereby, tax uncertainty and the risk of double taxation increases, dispute resolution (if available) avenues are further stressed, and arbitration measures may not be available.

With respect to arbitration, it should be adopted by every country to achieve mutuality with taxpayers, however some countries have expressly stated that they do not want to give up their control / sovereignty.  Unfortunately, OECD has not aggressively pursued this remedy for multilateral agreement.

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