Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Archive for the ‘OECD / UN’ Category

OECD: Transfer Pricing: Financial Transactions

The OECD recently published Transfer Pricing Guidance on Financial Transactions, an inclusive framework on BEPS Actions 4, 8-10.  This guidance takes into consideration comments received in the July 2018 discussion draft on financial transactions.

The guidance represent an update to the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines.  

This importance guidance presents guidance for:

Determination if the purported loan should be regarded as a loan

Treasury functions, including cash pooling, intracompany loans and hedging

Financial guarantees

Captive insurance

Risk-free and risk-adjusted rates of return

These principles are significant in scope and consequences that also allow countries to implement approaches in their domestic legislation, so there will be areas of dispute as this new guidance is implemented and interpreted.

 

http://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/transfer-pricing-guidance-on-financial-transactions-inclusive-framework-on-beps-actions-4-8-10.pdf

OECD CbC Consultation Document

The OECD has published its consultation document: Review of Country-by-Country Reporting (BEPS Action 13).  Comments are requested no later than March 6th.

Chapter 1 contains general topics concerning the implementation and operation of BEPS Action 13, including the MNE group experience of CbC reporting implementation by jurisdictions, the use of CbC reports by tax administrations and other aspects of BEPS Action 13, being the master file and local file.

Chapter 2 contains topics concerning the scope of CbC reporting, including the definition of an MNE group, and the level and operation of consolidated group revenue threshold.

Chapter 3 contains topics concerning the content of a CbC report, including whether aggregate or consolidated information should be provided in Table 1, whether information in Table 1 should be presented by entity rather than by tax jurisdiction, and whether additional or different information is needed.

http://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/public-consultation-document-review-country-by-country-reporting-beps-action-13-march-2020.pdf

One key item in the report is in Section 12: Should Table 1 information be presented on an entity or jurisdictional basis?  There are arguments pro and con, and this is an important item to monitor. 

OECD Pillar I: Transform ALP

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) held a public consultation on the Secretariat Proposal for a “Unified Approach” under Pillar 1 of the BEPS 2.0 project on 21-22 November 2019 in Paris at the OECD Conference Centre.

The OECD Secretariat laid out the timeline for meetings of the Inclusive Framework for the end of January 2020 and in June/July 2020, and suggested that, at a minimum, a high-level political agreement on the Pillar One framework must be achieved by the January meeting.

One commonality voiced at the meeting was that the existing global transfer pricing system, based on the arm’s-length principle, needs to be changed and should at least be augmented by some more formulaic rules.

This common voice is expressed in terms of Pillar One re: digital tax, although this concept has also been trending for international tax in general.  It will be interesting to watch this development as the meetings address Pillar Two and a global minimum tax.

Videos of the meeting and other details can be referenced in the EY Global Tax Alert.

https://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Report_on_recent_US_international_tax_developments_-_27_November_2019/$FILE/2019G_005349-19Gbl_Report%20on%20recent%20US%20intl%20tax%20developments%20-%2027%20Nov%202019.pdf

OECD Pillar II: GloBE

The OECD has released a public consultation document on Global Anti-Base Erosion (GloBE), providing novel new rules to address a global minimum tax structure.  Comments are due by 02 December 2019, which will assist members of the Inclusive Framework in the development of a solution for its final report to the G20 in 2020.

Comments are requested specifically in three areas: (i) use of financial accounts for tax tax base/timing differences, (ii) combining high-tax and low-tax income, and (iii) carve-out and threshold mechanisms.

The document is well worthy to read, as it shows the new direction (worldwide minimum tax), although the EU and others are yet to be completely convinced.  

The document is referenced for review.

https://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/public-consultation-document-global-anti-base-erosion-proposal-pillar-two.pdf.pdf

UN: Practical Manual on TP

As the OECD ventures forth in digital transactions and global minimum tax standards, it is always helpful to keep in  mind the UN Practical TP Manual for Developing Countries, which adheres to the arm’s-length principle.  Links to the Manual and the Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters are provided for reference.

In April 2019, a new chapter was added on Financial Transactions, Profit Splits and revised text on establishing Transfer Pricing Capability, Risk Assessment and Transfer Pricing Audits.

  • Attachment A: the proposed new Chapter B on Financial Transactions. The draft discusses the importance of corporate financing decisions within multinational groups and how those decisions could lead to tax base erosion. The Chapter discusses interaction with rules and measures against base erosion; common types of intra- group financial transactions and of group financing departments; the process of actual delineation and relevant characteristics of financial transactions; the process and system of credit rating; potential transfer pricing methods, including the use of simplification measures/safe harbours; different types of intra group loans and relevant characteristics; determining the arm’s length nature of intra-group loans; different types of intra group financial guarantees and relevant characteristics; determining the arm’s length nature of intra-group financial guarantees; and available methods. The chapter also discusses cash pooling practices and captive insurance, without getting into further detail on the delineation and arm’s length pricing of those specific transactions. Different types of intra-group loans are mentioned, and the draft identifies four steps to determine the arm’s length nature of intra-group loans: (i) analyse economically relevant characteristics; (ii) accurately delineate the entire transaction undertaken as well as (iii) selection and (iv) application, of the most appropriate transfer pricing method. 
  • Attachment B: Revision to the guidance contained in the Manual on the transactional profit-split method (Chapter B.3.3.) with the main focus being on seeking consistency of this guidance with the work done in the context of the Inclusive Framework on BEPS, while providing more practical examples.
  • Attachment C: A progress draft of the work on sections C.2. Establishing Transfer Pricing Capability in Developing Countries (previously C.5.); C.4. Risk Assessment (Previously part of C.3.) and C.5. Transfer Pricing Audits. The purpose is mainly to streamline the sequences of presentation and to eliminate overlaps in the current text.

https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/18STM_CRP1_Update-UN-Practical-Manual-on-Transfer-Pricing.pdf

https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/tax-committee/about-committee-tax-experts.html

Austria: Digital tax 2020

Austria will welcome in the New Year with a 5% digital advertising tax and stricter governance rules.

EY’s Global Tax Alert provides details of this development.

https://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Austrian_Government_approves_digital_advertising_tax_bill/$FILE/2019G_004459-19Gbl_Indirect_Austrian%20Gov%20approves%20digital%20advertising%20tax%20bill.pdf

UN: Manual for Treaty Negotiations

As tax treaties become more important in the international tax landscape, for both developed and developing countries, it is important to review practical guidance provided to tax administrations to enforce such treaties.  This is a valuable primer for those involved in tax treaty interpretation and negotiation.  The recently released Manual is provided as a reference link.

The present publication, entitled United Nations Manual for the Negotiation of Bilateral Tax Treaties between Developed and Developing Countries (the Manual), aims at strengthening the technical expertise of developing countries’ tax officials as regards the negotiation of tax treaties.

It provides practical guidance to treaty negotiators in developing countries, in particular those who use the United Nations Model Double Taxation Convention between Developed and Developing Countries (the UN Model).

This Manual constitutes an introductory guide to tax treaty negotiations and, as such, provides general explanations on the way treaty negotiations are conducted and on the issues that are typically addressed during these negotiations. While it seeks to identify important issues that treaty negotiators should be aware of, it does not attempt to provide an exhaustive analysis of these issues. When preparing for treaty negotiations, the user of this Manual will therefore often need to go beyond the explanations provided in these pages and to further research the issues that are identified therein. keeping in mind that the detailed Commentaries on the provisions of the United Nations Model Double Taxation Convention between Developed and Developing Countries and of the OECD Model Tax Convention on Income and on Capital constitute the most authoritative source of information on the interpretation of these provisions.

https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/manual-bilateral-tax-treaties-update-2019.pdf

%d bloggers like this: