Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Posts tagged ‘OECD’

OECD: CbCR update

OECD has published the December 20109 update for implementation of country-by-country reporting (CbCR).

The table of contents conveniently provides the date for the updating of the relevant sections.  The local filing section indicates a December 2019 update.

The guidance link is referenced for review.

http://www.oecd.org/ctp/guidance-on-the-implementation-of-country-by-country-reporting-beps-action-13.pdf

OECD: Tax ruling exchange

The OECD/G20d BEPS Project has published: Harmful Tax Practices – 2018 Peer Review Reports on the Exchange of Information on Tax Rulings, referenced herein.  This is the third annual peer review of the transparency framework. It covers individual reports for 112 jurisdictions, including 20 jurisdictions reviewed for the first time.

The transparency framework requires spontaneous exchange of information on five categories of taxpayer-specific rulings: (i) rulings related to certain preferential regimes, (ii) unilateral advance pricing arrangements (APAs) or other cross-border unilateral rulings in respect of transfer pricing, (iii) rulings providing for a downward adjustment of taxable adjustment of taxable profits (iv) PE rulings and (v) related party conduit rulings.

The requirement to exchange information on the rulings in the above categories includes certain past rulings as well as future rulings, pursuant to pre-defined periods which are outlined in each jurisdiction’s report and that varies according to the time when a certain jurisdiction has joined the Inclusive Framework or has been identified as a Jurisdiction of Relevance. The exchanges occur pursuant to international exchange of information agreements, which provide the legal conditions under which exchanges take place, including the need to ensure taxpayer confidentiality.

 

https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/7cc5b1a2-en.pdf?expires=1577490104&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=E74BCF40FC3C25437B469E07971C928B

OECD Pillar I: Transform ALP

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) held a public consultation on the Secretariat Proposal for a “Unified Approach” under Pillar 1 of the BEPS 2.0 project on 21-22 November 2019 in Paris at the OECD Conference Centre.

The OECD Secretariat laid out the timeline for meetings of the Inclusive Framework for the end of January 2020 and in June/July 2020, and suggested that, at a minimum, a high-level political agreement on the Pillar One framework must be achieved by the January meeting.

One commonality voiced at the meeting was that the existing global transfer pricing system, based on the arm’s-length principle, needs to be changed and should at least be augmented by some more formulaic rules.

This common voice is expressed in terms of Pillar One re: digital tax, although this concept has also been trending for international tax in general.  It will be interesting to watch this development as the meetings address Pillar Two and a global minimum tax.

Videos of the meeting and other details can be referenced in the EY Global Tax Alert.

https://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Report_on_recent_US_international_tax_developments_-_27_November_2019/$FILE/2019G_005349-19Gbl_Report%20on%20recent%20US%20intl%20tax%20developments%20-%2027%20Nov%202019.pdf

OECD Pillar II: GloBE

The OECD has released a public consultation document on Global Anti-Base Erosion (GloBE), providing novel new rules to address a global minimum tax structure.  Comments are due by 02 December 2019, which will assist members of the Inclusive Framework in the development of a solution for its final report to the G20 in 2020.

Comments are requested specifically in three areas: (i) use of financial accounts for tax tax base/timing differences, (ii) combining high-tax and low-tax income, and (iii) carve-out and threshold mechanisms.

The document is well worthy to read, as it shows the new direction (worldwide minimum tax), although the EU and others are yet to be completely convinced.  

The document is referenced for review.

https://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/public-consultation-document-global-anti-base-erosion-proposal-pillar-two.pdf.pdf

OECD: Pillar One & Two

The OECD has now two proposals in process: Pillar One addresses the digital economy and Pillar Two sets forth a global minimum tax system; global anti-base erosion (GloBE) proposal.  The proposals are linked herein for reference.

Both proposals may have one or more legal entities of a multinational taxed on more than one approach, whether they have a digital business segment, and also dependent on the countries where it is taxed notwithstanding the type of business it operates.

This represents a new era of BEPS, and one that demands attention to as the proposals move forward.

Pillar One summary

  • Scope. The approach covers highly digital business models but goes wider – broadly focusing on consumer-facing businesses with further work to be carried out on scope and carve-outs. Extractive industries are assumed to be out of the scope.
  • New Nexus. For businesses within the scope, it creates a new nexus, not dependent on physical presence but largely based on sales. The new nexus could have thresholds including country specific sales thresholds calibrated to ensure that jurisdictions with smaller economies can also benefit. It would be designed as a new self-standing treaty provision.
  • New Profit Allocation Rule going beyond the Arm’s Length Principle. It creates a new profit allocation rule applicable to taxpayers within the scope, and irrespective of whether they have an in-country marketing or distribution presence (permanent establishment or separate subsidiary) or sell via unrelated distributors. At the same time, the approach largely retains the current transfer pricing rules based on the arm’s length principle but complements them with formula based solutions in areas where tensions in the current system are the highest.
  • Increased Tax Certainty delivered via a Three Tier Mechanism. The approach increases tax certainty for taxpayers and tax administrations and consists of a three tier profit allocation mechanism, as follows:
  • ‒  Amount A – a share of deemed residual profit6 allocated to market jurisdictions using a formulaic approach, i.e. the new taxing right
  • ‒  Amount B – a fixed remuneration for baseline marketing and distribution functions that take place in the market jurisdiction; and
  • ‒  Amount C – binding and effective dispute prevention and resolution mechanisms relating to all elements of the proposal, including any additional profit where in-country functions exceed the baseline activity compensated under Amount B.

Pillar Two Summary

Under Pillar Two, the Members of the Inclusive Framework have agreed to explore an approach that leaves jurisdictions free to determine their own tax system, including whether they have a corporate income tax and where they set their tax rates, but considers the right of other jurisdictions to apply the rules explored further below where income is taxed at an effective rate below a minimum rate. Within this context, and on a without prejudice basis, the members of the Inclusive Framework have agreed a programme of work that contains exploration of an inclusion rule, a switch over rule, an undertaxed payment rule, and a subject to tax rule. They have further agreed to explore, as part of this programme of work, issues related to rule co-ordination, simplification, thresholds, compatibility with international obligations and any other issues that may emerge in the course of the work.

Members of the Inclusive Framework agree that any rules developed under this Pillar should not result in taxation where there is no economic profit nor should they result in double taxation.

This part sets out the global anti-base erosion (GloBE) proposal which seeks to address remaining BEPS risk of profit shifting to entities subject to no or very low taxation It first provides background including the proposed rationale for the proposal and then summarises the mechanics of the proposed rules together with a summary of the issues that will be explored as part of the programme of work.

While the measures set out in the BEPS package have further aligned taxation with value creation and closed gaps in the international tax architecture that allowed for double non-taxation, certain members of the Inclusive Framework consider that these measures do not yet provide a comprehensive solution to the risk that continues to arise from structures that shift profit to entities subject to no or very low taxation. These members are of the view that profit shifting is particularly acute in connection with profits relating to intangibles, prevalent in the digital economy, but also in a broader context; for instance group entities that are financed with equity capital and generate profits, from intra-group financing or similar activities, that are subject to no or low taxes in the jurisdictions where those entities are established.

 

https://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/public-consultation-document-secretariat-proposal-unified-approach-pillar-one.pdf

https://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/programme-of-work-to-develop-a-consensus-solution-to-the-tax-challenges-arising-from-the-digitalisation-of-the-economy.pdf

TP Toolkit; a new guide

The Platform for Collaboration on Tax – a joint initiative of the IMF, OECD, UN and World Bank Group – has undertaken, at the request of the G20, the development of a series of “Toolkits” to help guide developing countries in the implementation of policy options for issues in international taxation of greatest relevance to these countries.

This toolkit, in draft version, is intended to provide an analysis of policy options and a “source book” of guidance and examples to assist low capacity countries in implementing efficient and effective transfer pricing documentation regimes.

This first part of the Toolkit provides information on the background, context and objectives of transfer pricing documentation regimes.

Part II then discusses a number of general policy options and legislative approaches relevant to all types of documentation requirements.

PART II. OPTIONS FOR COUNTRIES TO IMPLEMENT TRANSFER PRICING DOCUMENTATION

This section discusses various policy considerations and options relevant to designing a regime for transfer pricing documentation. These include:

  1. The regulatory framework, through a combination of primary legislation, secondary legislation and guidance;
  2. Confidentiality of taxpayers’ documentation and information;
  3. Timing issues concerning when documentation must be in place and when it is required to be submitted to the tax administration;
  4. Enforcement, including penalties and measures to assist and promote voluntary compliance;
  5. Dealing with access to information outside the jurisdiction; and
  6. Simplification and exemptions.

Part III focuses more specifically at each kind of documentation in turn, and examines the specific policy choices that are relevant to each, as well as providing a number of examples of country practices.

The final part sets out a number of conclusions.

 

https://www.oecd.org/tax/beps/draft-toolkit-transfer-pricing-documentation-platform-for-collaboration-on-tax.pdf

French DST & Wine: US uncertainty

As the French digital services tax (DST) is in effect from 1/1/2019, with the first payment due in November, there is considerable uncertainty how this tax will be repealed/refunded when/if an OECD DST model takes its place.

The politicians see this as a potential remedy to put out the fire which started with implementation of this tax.  However, this issue becomes more complex from an international tax perspective as to how a refund/repeal would be treated: prospectively, retroactively, or some other method.

As this tax, similar to other provisions, was enacted unilaterally by the French administration anxious to improve their fisc, it is now shown to be disingenuous timing at the expense of multinationals which now have to pay this tax.  Hopefully, other countries do not follow this lead in advance of the OECD DST proposals.

https://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Report_on_recent_US_international_tax_developments_-_29_August_2019/$FILE/2019G_003927-19Gbl_Report%20on%20recent%20US%20international%20tax%20developments%20-%2029%20Aug%202019.pdf

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