Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Posts tagged ‘DPT’

Australia’s DPT: License to tax

EY’s Global Tax Alert provides details on Australia’s new Diverted Profits Tax (DPT), effective in 2018 for calendar year taxpayers.

  • Penalty up to 40% can be assessed
  • Interaction with transfer pricing documentation and country-by-country (CbC) risk assessment
  • Diverted profits taxed at less than 24% are vulnerable
  • Proactive review of one’s documentation and risk assessment is recommended

Australia has patterned their DPT after the UK implemented a similar scheme, although posing some different characteristics.

As countries are reaching out to tax profits that are subject to a lower rate of tax elsewhere, this is providing a license to tax that cannot be ignored by multinationals with Australian operations.

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Australia_passes_Diverted_Profits_Tax_and_Penalties_law/$FILE/2017G_01485-171Gbl_Australia%20passes%20Diverted%20Profits%20Tax%20and%20Penalties%20law.pdf

Australia’s Diverted Profits Tax salvo

The Australian Tax Office (ATO) has recently released a consultation paper re: implementation of a Diverted Profits Tax (DPT); comments are due by 17 June 2016.  Although Australia has taken a long look at the DPT in concert with UK’s quickly enacted provisions, it took a breather while the OECD urged restraint on a far-reaching “tax” that may go beyond the intent of the OECD’s Guidelines.  A link to the paper is provided for reference:

http://www.treasury.gov.au/~/media/Treasury/Consultations%20and%20Reviews/Consultations/2016/Implementing%20a%20diverted%20profits%20tax/Key%20Documents/PDF/Diverted-profits-tax_discussion-paper.ashx

The focus of the paper is summarized in the first sentence: “The Government is strongly committed to ensuring that multinationals pay their fair share of tax in Australia.”

Highlights of the proposal:

  • 40% penalty tax (non-deductible) rate, not offset by another jurisdiction’s tax (30% tax rate if an amended tax return is filed)
  • Subjective determination (i.e. reasonable to conclude)
  • Will not operate on a self-assessment basis
  • Pay first, discuss later philosophy, copying UK’s direction (12-month review period and a right to appeal)
  • Effective for years commencing on or after 1 July, 2017
  • Flow chart appendix
  • Efective for transactions that have an effective tax mismatch test (objective test) and insufficient economic substance (subjective test)
  • Draft guidance will be developed in consultation with stakeholders.

All interested parties should review this consultation paper, and provide comments to the ATO for potential changes.  It is interesting to see that transactions failing the effective mismatch test will be left exclusively with subjective determinations for possible assessments by the ATO without the benefit of dual transparency.  Additionally, the philosophy of assess now and discuss later will not be a mechanism to effectively provide more trust by taxpayers as UK, Australia and other jurisdictions are creating unilateral laws to capture taxes payable on income in other jurisdictions, potentially without the right to access treaties, claim an offset in the other jurisdictions and have access to the full process of appeals prior to payment.  As a result, the incidence of double taxation will increase.

It is hopeful the ATO will consider the comments received, and include changes to the current proposal to enhance transparency and mutuality by all parties.

 

 

 

UK: HMRC Penalties Discussion Document

HMRC published a discussion document on 2 February addressing the role and imposition of penalties, with a closing date for comments 11 May 2015.  A link to the document is included:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/400211/150130_HMRC_Penalties_a_Discussion_Document_FINAL_FOR_PUBLICATION__2_.pdf

Key Points:

  • HMRC’s compliance strategy is based on three principles: Promote good compliance via systems/processes, prevent non-compliance and respond to risks.
  • Questions for comment address concerns about current penalties and suggestions for changing the penalties process.
  • The process and next steps are developed in 5 stages: (1) Setting out objectives, (2) Developing options and a framework for implementation, (3) Drafting legislation, (4) Implementing/monitoring the change, and (5) Reviewing/evaluation the change.
  • Annex A provides an overview of the main penalty regimes, with a matrix of penalty percentages dependent on careless, deliberate, or deliberate and concealed behavior.

The document represents a willingness and “good faith” effort on behalf of HMRC to address the current state and request comments for Best Practice processes.  Interested parties should review the document and provide comments accordingly.

As the Diverted Profits Tax option seems to be moving forward quickly to be potentially effective in April, 2015, relevant processes for imposition of a 5% “tax penalty” and accelerated payments should be weighed against the five principles of HMRC’s penalty process.  The five principles state: The penalty regime should be designed from the customer perspective, they should be proportionate, penalties must be applied fairly ensuring that compliant customers are in a better position, penalties must provide a credible threat and customers should see a consistent and standardized approach.  Does the Diverted Profits tax process and objectives meet the principles expressed in the Discussion Document?

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