Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Posts tagged ‘US tax reform’

US tax reform: 1 step closer

The US Senate passed their version of the Fiscal Year Budget 2018, an important step that leads to reconciliation of the budget this coming week by the House and Senate.

Following the budget reconciliation, allowing a majority vote for tax reform, US tax reform is now on the horizon for potential enactment by year-end 2017.

To the extent potential US tax reform has been on the backstage, or ignored by pessimists, this latest step should be a strong indication that everyone needs to understand the Framework, albeit brief, previously announced and advocated by President Trump.

Attention is now in the details, with significant tax and business consequences for the US and the world.

EY’s Global Tax Alert provides additional details on this latest development.

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Report_on_recent_US_international_tax_developments_-_20_October_2017/$FILE/2017G_05952-171Gbl_Report%20on%20recent%20US%20international%20tax%20developments%20-%2020%20October%202017.pdf

Policy issues: US int’l tax reform

The Joint Committee of Taxation (JCT) has published a valuable reference to the principles underlying tax reform that will be presented to the Senate Finance Committee on October 3, 2017.

This reference is a helpful document into understanding some of the rationale and intentions that will become a part of the legislative writing process, as it includes background context of the issues.

A link to the JCT site and document is provided.

https://www.jct.gov

US Tax Framework in print

The US Tax Framework was published Sept. 27, a notable date as this date is also used to mark the timeframe for expensing investments.

The main corporate tax points, and subtleties, include:

  • 20% corporate tax rate, but the tax rate and differential for one-time foreign earnings/cash is not specified.
  • Minimum tax on foreign profits to “level the playing field”
  • Territoriality system, exempting 100% of dividends (although the KPMG linked notes include the point that this is not equivalent to “distributions” thus a complicated Earnings and Profits tracking system may still apply)
  • Interest expense will be “limited” (EBITDA/other?)
  • R&D credit remains, although Sec. 199 US manufacturing incentive deduction is lost
  • Pass-through structures tax rate of 25%
  • Corporate AMT is gone.

The President has formally and forcefully announced his continued message for tax reform, as both the House and Senate Committees are now drafting language that will hopefully result in legislation enacted late 2017 or early 2018 with the political complexities / process.

Upon enactment, the US GAAP tax accounting will be complex and required results for public companies in the quarter of enactment.  Additionally, the timing for state enactment is also a separate complex issue that will need analysis.

The US Framework is repeatedly attempting to “level the playing field,” now the politicians, journalists, advisors and tax practitioners will all work with a little bit of fact to create a cocoon of fiction by which the impending tax reform can be measured.  

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/US_tax_reform_framework_calls_for_reduced_tax_rates_a_territorial_system_and_level_international_playing_field/$FILE/2017G_05589-171Gbl_US%20tax%20reform%20-%20corporate%20and%20international%20provisions.pdf

https://www.treasury.gov/press-center/press-releases/Documents/Tax-Framework.pdf

US int’l developments

EY’s Global Tax Alert highlights several postulates for potential US tax reform, in which both the House and Senate are busily writing new language this month to push this reform effort by President Trump.

The OECD’s additional guidance on Country-by-Country reporting is also reiterated, and the short-term extension for the US debt limit is provided to further the tax reform process.

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Report_on_recent_US_international_tax_developments_-_8_September_2017/$FILE/2017G_05086-171Gbl_Report%20on%20recent%20US%20international%20tax%20developments%20-%208%20September%202017.pdf

US tax reform: Tax accounting impact

As the time for US seems to tick ever closer, EY’s Global Tax Alert highlights the tax accounting implications that would take effect on the “enactment date.”

Key items for consideration:

  • Tax attributes re: one-time repatriation/taxation of foreign earnings
  • Capital expensing impact
  • State tax impact, dependent on if they automatically follow federal tax law
  • APB 23, how will this be affected?

Although such items are hypothetical at the moment, some items may require additional planning to have the data available for the requisite disclosures.  Thus, the time for planning and consideration is the present.

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/US_Administration_releases_Joint_Statement_on_Reform_-_Income_Tax_accounting_considerations_related_to_potential_future_US_tax_legislation_and_steps_companies_can_take_now_to_prepare/$FILE/2017G_04560-172Gbl_US%20joint%20statement%20on%20tax%20reform.pdf

US update: Tax reform is near

With the (unexpected) victory for President-elect Trump, coupled with a majority in both the House and Senate, it is highly likely US tax reform is near.  There is a close correlation with Trump’s Plan and the Republican’s Blueprint tax reform initiative, although transitional details (Foreign Tax Credits, Earnings & Profits, etc.) still need to be completed.  The US tax rate may no longer be one of the highest in the world, and the tax economics of moving business initiatives, and repatriating cash, to the US are welcome thoughts for US based multinationals.  However, attention needs to be focused on the details, including Q4 2016 actions that may provide more efficiencies for the expected 2017 US tax reform.

EY’s Global Tax Alert, and the Blueprint are included for reference.

http://www.ey.com/gl/en/services/tax/international-tax/alert–us-election-2016-and-the-tax-landscape

https://abetterway.speaker.gov/_assets/pdf/ABetterWay-Tax-PolicyPaper.pdf

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