Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

Posts tagged ‘CbC reporting’

US CbC Agreements

The US jurisdictional Country-by-Country (CbC) status table, link provided herein, provides a quick reference into the countries that will automatically accept the US 2016 CbC report, as it is not an obligatory filing for US MNE’s.  To the extent a country is not on this list, a detailed review will be required to ensure that timely reporting is done, possibly on a surrogate country basis.

This list should be monitored to ensure proper governance of the CbC reporting requirements, noting that filing less reports is simpler due to possible different rules, currencies and/or interpretations of similar rules by different countries.

https://www.irs.gov/businesses/country-by-country-reporting-jurisdiction-status-table

BEPS TP & CbC reporting: EY Survey

EY’s survey of nearly 100 jurisdictions provides timely insight into unilateral activities and required legislative efforts to implement OECD BEPS Actions 8-10, transfer pricing guidelines, and Action13, transfer pricing documentation / country-by-country (CbC) reporting.

A link to the survey is provided for reference:

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-country-implementation-of-beps-actions-8-10-and-13/$FILE/EY-country-implementation-of-beps-actions-8-10-and-13.pdf

Key observations:

  • OECD TP Guidelines:
    • 7 countries (including the UK) to adopt the changes without need for legislative/administrative action
    • 54 countries refer to OECD TP Guidelines by tax authorities/courts for interpretation, but are not binding
    • 21 countries refer to OECD TP Guidelines in domestic legislation
  • TP Guidelines are meant to be an extension of the Commentary to the arm’s length principle in Article 9; if the revised Guidelines go beyond such rules a change in existing treaties will be required for implementation, although the multilateral instrument in development under Action 15 may remedy this
  • Tax authorities have used BEPS initiatives for leverage in Australia, Spain, Hungary, New Zealand, Finland, Indonesia, France and India
  • TP and CbC documentation may be provided as an exchange of information if they are “foreseeably relevant”
  • Legislative action will be required in most countries with current TP legislation to implement Master / Local File requirements
  • Most countries will require a change in law for CbC reporting; 38 countries are/will have such implementation legislation, 49 countries are not yet known, while only 11 countries are not expected to implement in the short/medium term
  • CbC information will be widely exchanged via exchange of information articles in double-tax treaties, tax information exchange agreements or Article 6 of the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters (and the corresponding Multilateral Competent Authority Agreement)

The survey is a “must read” for interested parties that will be affected by OECD Actions 8-10 and 13; it magnifies the imperative of collecting such information timely and is not dependent on which countries adopt certain provisions the first year (as information will be exchanged quickly around the world regardless of which jurisdiction the parent entity resides in).

European Commission: Transparency blueprint

Commissioner Moscovici’s recent speech addressing the future of tax policy aims at developing an ambitious blueprint for taxation in Europe.  A link to his speech is provided for reference:

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-15-4900_en.htm

Key comments:

  • Enhanced EU transparency in tax matters
  • Coordination of Member States tax systems
  • Cooperation between Member States, exemplified by EU Tax Transparency Package initiative (refer to 22 March 2015 post)
  • Full transparency cost/benefit assessment re: Country-by-Country reporting for public disclosure
  • New Action plan before summer (an issue that is fundamental to the EU) building on global developments
  • Assess relaunch of Common Consolidated Corporate tax base (CCCTB)

The European Commission is accelerating its efforts, resulting in a potentially different documentation framework than the OECD Guidelines may suggest and/or a basis that the rest of world will follow.  The Commission has the necessary momentum and political cohesiveness to achieve its efforts for the EU, although with a possible demarcation with the rest of the world.

CbC reporting by MNE’s continues its actions on center stage as MNE’s should plan for (if they have not already) public disclosure of such reporting.  Thereby, the topics of supplemental reporting (i.e. indirect tax contributions, etc.) become more important for senior leaders to consider.  Finally, such disclosure warrants a seamless governance process and alignment for addressing future questions by interested parties.

UK: Diverted Profits Tax & CbC reporting

HMRC is taking a unilateral proactive lead in devising measures based on OECD BEPS initiatives that introduce a diverted profits tax, as well as country by country (CbC) reporting for UK headquartered MNE’s.  A Tax Journal summary provides a summary of the diverted profits tax, which is linked herein, in addition to the HMRC source articles for application of the diverted profits tax and CbC reporting.

http://www.taxjournal.com/tj/articles/google-tax-sends-clear-message-multinationals-divert-profits-10122014

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/385741/Diverted_Profits_Tax.pdf

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/385161/TIIN_2150.pdf

Diverted Profits Tax:

This measure will introduce a new 25% tax (regular tax rate plus a punitive component) on diverted profits. The diverted profits tax will operate through two basic rules. The first rule counteracts arrangements by which foreign companies exploit the permanent establishment rules. The second rule prevents companies from creating tax advantages by using transactions or entities that lack economic substance.  The proposal will be effective as of 01 April 2015.

The main objective of the diverted profits tax is to counteract contrived arrangements used by large groups (typically multinational enterprises) that result in the erosion of the UK tax base.

CbC reporting:

The publication allows regulations to be issued re: CbC reporting for UK-based companies after the OECD publishes guidance on how the reports should be filed and how the information in them may be shared between relevant countries, and after a period of consultation in the UK.

After issuance of the hybrid mismatch rules (post of 7 December 2014) that patiently await the final OECD guidelines for consensus in its guidelines, the diverted profits tax mechanism will be in effect next year prior to final OECD guidelines and subject to other countries following a similar early unilateral lead as incentivized by the BEPS initiatives.

The CbC reporting is addressed at UK-based MNE’s, while presumably non-UK based MNE guidance for such reporting will be also be issued in the near future.

These initiatives may target legal mechanisms that the taxpayer will need to defend aggressively, while advancing preparation for timely compliance for CbC reporting.  Additionally, other countries may use this information via automatic exchange of information to assist in transfer pricing risk assessment.  The initiatives should be reviewed in detail to better understand the rules, and trends, for these proposals.

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