Strategizing International Tax Best Practices – by Keith Brockman

On 24 July 2019, French President Emmanuel Macron signed the bill introducing the Digital Services Tax (DST) and the partial freeze of the corporate income tax rate decrease.  The DST consists of a 3% levy applied to revenue derived from specific digital activities by companies with a qualifying revenue of more than €750 million worldwide and €25 million in France.

The bill was published in the Journal Officiel on 25 July 2019, leading to the entry into force of the bill.

This formal action is expected to be met with repercussions, as well as similar unilateral initiatives, in other countries.  

Instead of benefiting from a 31% CIT rate on their taxable income exceeding €500,000, as stated by the Finance Bill for 2018,2these “large” companies will still be taxed at the former 33.1/3% rate for the 2019 timeframe noted above. However, the 28% CIT rate will still apply on the first €500,000 of their taxable income.

For FYs starting on or after 1 January 2020 and onwards, the progressive decrease of the French CIT rate (down to 25%, by 2022), as stated by the Finance Bill for 2018,3 should remain unchanged. Yet, according to a recent statement made by the French Economy and Finance Minister, Mr. Bruno Le Maire, for 2020, companies with revenue equal to, or higher than €250 million, may be taxed at a rate of 31% instead of 28%, as initially announced (for 2020, all other companies would still benefit from the 28% CIT rate). This remains to be confirmed by the next Finance Bill.

 

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